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Preservation + Pints (Or Shots)

By Sarah Marsom

Craft breweries and distilleries have swept Ohio by storm. Many breweries are hoping to revitalize the state’s history as a beer capital, and many distilleries are using historical beverages to inspire their contemporary palates. Here are a few places you should try!

Elevator Brewery and Draught Haus (Columbus)—both a popular bar and eye catching building in Columbus. Elevator Brewery’s history dates back to 1897. Located in the Bott Brothers’ Billiards building, this contemporary bar thrives on its historical elements—the billiards tables from the 1800s, stained glass entry, tile floors, decorative ceilings, and a well preserved bar. The Elevator Brewery and Draught Haus is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Columbia Building. You can go to www.elevatorbrewing.com for more information.

Image source: elevatorbrewing.com

Image source: elevatorbrewing.com

Rhinegeist (Cincinnati)—Rhinegeist means “ghost of the Rhine”, and bringing a ghost back to life is exactly what this beer company did! Located in the historic Over-the-Rhine brewery district, Rhinegeist is revitalizing the beer industry, which made the area thrive in the late 1800s. Prohibition put 38 breweries out of business and left countless German immigrants unemployed. In the recent past, developers have been revitalizing the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood; Rhinegeist has sparked new life into Christian Moerling Brewing Company’s old bottling plant. Want to learn more about the building’s history and Rhinegeist? Take one of their guided tours. You can learn more at www.rhinegeist.com.

Image source: rhinegeist.com

Image source: rhinegeist.com

*Cincinnati is also home to underground brewery tours! This town’s beer history is deep!

Homestead Beer Co (Licking County)—while the brewery is not in a historic building, Homestead Beer Co has its headquarters in the very historic community of Granville, and the name evokes wonderment of the original farm settlements, which created a thriving Licking County in the 1800s. Homestead Brewing does not use modern yeast strains, instead preferring yeast which could have been used by grandfathers of the past to brew. With brew names such as 1805, Five Points Irish, and Barnraiser, one knows the people behind Homestead use the past as inspiration to create contemporary drinks. Go to www.homesteadbeerco.com to learn more.

Image source: homesteadbeerco.com

Image source: homesteadbeerco.com

E.S. Distillery (outside Fremont)—located in a 120-year-old barn, the Ernesto Scarano distillery is worth a visit. This craft distillery is supposedly the smallest legal whiskey distillery in America. Www.esdistillery.com for more information.

What are some of your favorite bars, breweries, or distilleries in Ohio with historic elements?  Add your favorites to the list in the comments section below.

 

 

 

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Your Krogering can help support Heritage Ohio

Yes, you can shop and assist Heritage Ohio at the same time, and it’s easy to do. Once again, Heritage Ohio is a nonprofit partner in Kroger’s Community Rewards program. What does that mean? Quite simply, each shopping trip to Kroger means a small donation for Heritage Ohio. And those small donations really add up. In fact, we’ve received over $1,200 to date, from people doing their everyday shopping at Kroger!

We’d love to have you as part of our Kroger shopping army, benefiting Heritage Ohio with each purchase. It’s easy to set up your Kroger Plus Card to direct your Community Rewards to Heritage Ohio. Just go to www.krogercommunityrewards.com and click the “Sign-In” button (if you haven’t registered your Kroger card yet, you can also do that from their website).

Then, go to the Community Rewards heading, toward the bottom of the page, and enter Heritage Ohio to search for us (or enter our Community Rewards ID which is 81631). Once Heritage Ohio comes up, click on “Enroll” and you’ll be set for the year.

Now, with every head of lettuce or gallon of milk you buy, you’re helping us to save the places that matter, build community, and live better. Thank you!

You can learn more and sign up here. If you sign up, let us know, so we can give you a proper thanks!

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Our Preservation Month Photo Contest is open!

Our annual Preservation Month Photo Contest has opened, and we’ve extended the entry deadline to May 29! You can learn more about the contest here.

For inspiration, check out one of our finalist images from 2013, photographed by Antony Seppi. As the metal covering of this downtown Hamilton building is removed, the architectural richness of the facade begins to shine through.

city-of-hamilton-artspace

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A sneak peek into what YOP is planning

We’re excited to start a new blog series this month, with preservation perspectives written by Young Ohio Preservationist members. Sarah Marsom, the YOP chair, kicks off the series this month.

The Young Ohio Preservationists are new to the scene and excited for 2015. We have already hosted a successful tour of the Cristo Rey Columbus High School, which was an exciting multi-million dollar tax credit project, and we had an engaging window restoration workshop, where we fixed all of the historic windows in a Dutch Colonial home in the Westgate neighborhood of Columbus.

Attendees of the windows workshop gather outside the Westgate home. Photo courtesy of Stephen Newport.

Attendees of the windows workshop gather outside the Westgate home. Photo courtesy of Stephen Newport.

It is the Young Ohio Preservationists board’s goal to provide unique experiences to both recreational and professional preservationists. And if you are wondering if you are too old to participate, do not worry! We invite people of all ages to engage with us.

Throughout the year we will be rolling out exclusive events, but here is a sneak peek for two experiences you cannot miss out on!

On April 25, the Young Ohio Preservationists are taking Newark by storm. The Licking County Foundation has invited us to tour the Louis Sullivan designed Home Building Association Bank, and they are coordinating some bonus historic building tours exclusively for the YOPs! Following the tours, we will be hosting a design charrette and helping the foundation brainstorm the best adaptive use opportunities for the Sullivan designed bank.

The Sullivan designed bank building in downtown Newark. Photo courtesy of Sarah Marsom.

The Sullivan designed bank building in downtown Newark. Photo courtesy of Sarah Marsom.

As part of the Green Lawn Abbey CLG grant, the YOPs will be hosting a marble cleaning workshop. Green Lawn Abbey is a 1927 neoclassical mausoleum listed in the National Register of Historic Places and has been undergoing a restoration for a number of years. The Centennial Preservation Group will teach participants the best practices for marble cleaning. Our assistance will bring Green Lawn Abbey one step closer to renting the space for events and creating a sustainable income source for maintenance.

Make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or join our mailing list by emailing yop@heritageohio.org to make sure you know about our events!

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Seven rules for success when reconditioning wood windows

Last weekend I had the privilege of attending one day of the two-day wood windows workshop put on by Young Ohio Preservationists. Led by restoration artisans Jim Turner and Patrick Kennedy, attendees had the opportunity to learn (or hone) their skills, whether removing sash (without damaging the surrounding wood components), stripping out old glazing, removing paint, reglazing the sash, or repairing damaged sash ropes. Both Jim and Patrick are experts who have forgotten more about restoring old windows than most of us will ever learn, and both shared a lot of great advice over the course of the day. Here are some tips you can use when tackling your own wood window restoration project.

1) Parts for repairs. Where do you get window parts for storms? Try Blaine Window Hardware. The instructors have sourced many a hard-to-find item from them.

2) Aluminum storm makeover. Tired of the look of your old aluminum storms? Before you consider tossing them, consider paint. Paint specifically formulated to coat aluminum has come a long way, and more colors than ever are available. Now, instead of dull, silvery outlines for your windows, you can consider a color that actually complements your home’s existing paint scheme.

Jim Turner, center, of Turner Restoration, pumps up workshop attendees Saturday morning with equal parts knowledge and inspiration.

Jim Turner, center, of Turner Restoration, pumps up workshop attendees Saturday morning with equal parts knowledge and inspiration.

3) Steam stripping. Consider a garment steamer (yes, a garment steamer) for stripping your sash. If you’ve ever stripped paint, you know it can be a messy job. As if the mess is bad enough, you also have to guard against removing paint that’s potentially lead-based. Sanding and scraping can release dangerous particulates, but steam stripping keeps airborne paint dust to an absolute minimum. From past experience, I’d recommend against using the Wagner Power Steamer. The Wagner model tends to spit out a lot of hot water, in addition to the steam. Instead, try a product like the Rowenta Commercial Garment Steamer (available from target.com here). Jim Turner brought his garment steamer, and it was all steam, no hot water, which made for a lot less mess. If you have a house full of windows or woodwork to strip, it’s worth the $100 investment to do it safely.

4) A better way to fish sash cord. Fishing sash cord, when you’re ready to reinstall your sash, can be a frustrating experience, as you try to loop the cord over the pulley, through the weight pocket, and down to the weight pocket door. The sash cord is so light that it bends and gets caught up on obstructions in the weight pocket, never making it to the bottom where you can tie on the sash weight. Instead, start with a length of metal chain taped to the sash cord. The metal will provide the needed weight to allow the cord to drop right to the bottom of the weight pocket.

5) Securing the sash cord to the sash. To secure the knotted end of the sash cord in the sash, insert a screw through the knot into the wood, instead of hammering a nail through it. A screw is much easier to remove in the event you need to remove the sash out of the window frame.

6) Refreshing your wood sash. You can refresh old, dry wood, prior to painting, with a recipe of 1/2 gallon turpentine, 1/2 gallon boiled linseed oil, and 1 ounce of paraffin. The linseed oil will rejuvenate the wood fibers, and the paraffin will act as a decent water barrier. The turpentine is the vehicle to deliver the linseed oil and paraffin into the wood, so it can soak in.

7) Saving your parting stop. The parting bead, or parting stop, is the bane of window restorers everywhere, because it’s so easy to snap them while you’re working to remove the sash. Instead of using vise grips or pliers to try to pull out the parting stop, try vise grips with long jaws. The increased surface area means there’s less chance of marring the parting stop, while spreading out the pressure point, meaning less chance of snapping the stop as you try to wiggle it loose. (Give me a pair of these, and I feel like I could conquer the window restoration world!)

While there’s a lot of practice, knowledge, and equipment, that goes into proper window restoration, having some tricks of the trade up your sleeve can make the process easier, and, actually, fun. And rewarding.

Do you have a great window restoration story to tell? Would you like to see another hands-on workshop? Let us know. Thanks for reading!

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Tuning up your vision statement

We’re winding up our evaluation season. Each year, we evaluate every Main Street program in Ohio using 10 different criteria. One of the items we review during each evaluation is the MS program’s mission and vision statement, reviewing its relevance, and sometimes making suggestions to tweak, or overhaul, if needed. Programs run the gamut of vision statements, but sometimes we run into confusion, because the local program isn’t exactly sure what makes a good vision statement.

Simply put, the vision and mission statements should pair nicely: the mission statement says what you want to accomplish, and the vision statement describes your district when you’ve accomplished that mission. Thankfully, we have a one-pager from Marc Smiley that provides some basics on what a good vision statement should look like. You can check it out here.

Here’s an example of a vision statement from Heritage Centre Association, the Main Street program in Mount Vernon: The Heritage Centre Association’s vision for Mount Vernon is a downtown brimming with activity in a beautiful setting with green spaces and well-preserved, lovingly restored, fully utilized historic buildings. It includes a thriving retail and restaurant district, ample parking and easy access to trails, waterways, and parks–a place where people of all ages come to shop, dine, work, and live. Residents and visitors alike can enjoy educational, arts, and cultural experiences and participate in a variety of community events. This vision includes thoughtful and generous involvement by community and business leaders and the support of a downtown organization with adequate, consistent funding and purposeful direction.

A good vision statement will literally paint the picture (with text) of what your revitalized district will look like when you've accomplished your mission.

A good vision statement will literally paint the picture (with text) of what your revitalized district will look like when you’ve accomplished your mission.

Sometimes, the vision of what makes for a “revitalized” downtown can differ drastically from person to person, and organization to organization. In the example above, HCA has succinctly spelled out their vision for a revitalized downtown, and what it includes.

If you’re a fan of Marc Smiley as much as we are then you’ll be pleased to know we’re bringing Marc back to Ohio (specifically to Columbus) on May 19. Be sure to put the date on your calendar, and stay tuned to heritageohio.org for updates and registration information.

Update: registration for Marc Smiley’s workshop in Columbus has opened. You can register here.

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Reasons to protest a National Register listing?

A Xenia newspaper recently reported on local efforts to list Xenia’s Carnegie Library in the National Register of Historic Places, an effort that has met with resistance from the owners of the building, the Greene County Commissioners. You can read the article here.

As you may know, National Register listing typically conveys a couple benefits on the owner of the listed building: a measure of pride and satisfaction at receiving recognition of the building’s historic status (typically for owners of residential properties), or access to redevelopment incentives (for owners of commercial rental property). National Register listing can also assist in efforts to preserve a historic building against unwanted federal intrusions, or when federal money is used (commonly referred to as the Section 106 process).

When it comes to National Register listing, there are only benefits, not restrictions. In fact, an owner can have his or her building listed one day, and tear it down the next day. We still occasionally hear the myth that National Register listing entails restrictions, when someone is protesting National Register listing (we got a little into NR myths and misinformation after Barb Powers excellent conference session here). And when it comes to redevelopment of historic buildings, we recommend National Register listing, even if the owner has no intention of investing in the building’s rehabilitation. A developer looking to rehabilitate a historic building has cleared an important hurdle when purchasing a building already listed in the National Register.

Xenia's Carnegie Library

Xenia’s Carnegie Library

In a letter to the State Historic Preservation Office, the county administrator stated that the county commissioners didn’t see a benefit to listing, nor was he sure about the compatibility of an elevator within a historic space (his written comments, according to the article: All the history, does an elevator marry well with the history.)

The administrator goes on to state that while he understands there’s no barrier to demolition, once a building is listed, he doesn’t want the barrier (?) of National Register listing in place should the commissioners decide ultimately to demolish.

While the county commissioners, and administrator, don’t see the benefit of listing, I’d encourage them not to stand in the way of listing, especially when it’s been completed at no (or very minimal) cost to the county by volunteers. It can only improve the marketability of the building, when the commissioners do decide to sell.

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3 signs your contractor is doing more harm than good to your masonry building

We learn early on in the preservation field about the dangers of abrasive “cleaning” on old masonry. Heck, it’s even immortalized in the Secretary’s standards, saying, “Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the GENTLEST means possible (my emphasis). Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.” (What’s that? You’d like a refresher on the other 9 standards? OK, you can check ’em out here.)

I like to refer to this as the sandblasting standard; in other words, don’t do it! When it comes to masonry, don’t blast it. Don’t blast with sand, water, walnut shells, ice pellets,  or anything else that comes out of a heavy rubber hose at high pressure. Just don’t.

Sometimes I forget that not everyone who owns an old, historic masonry building has learned this important lesson, so I’m asking you today, dear reader, to help us get the message out. Let design review boards, preservation groups, owners of brick buildings, and anyone else who could benefit from the knowledge, know that blasting historic masonry is just plain bad.

Meanwhile, I’ll share with you my unfortunate experience I had the other day, and some signs that the masonry contractor is doing more harm than good to your building.

These guys may be setting a speed record on paint removal. That's not a good thing.

These guys may be setting a speed record on paint removal. That’s not a good thing.

1. Fast paint removal

I’ve always thought of any construction project as having three pillars of output: time, price, and quality. Of course, every owner wishes to have the project done quickly, cheaply, and of high quality. But in this case, two out of three is perfection. You can’t have all three, so you have to decide which two you’re going to focus on (might I suggest high quality as one of the two).

This means that if you want something done quickly and to high quality, you’ll pay the price. If you want something done cheaply and to high quality, you can bet it will take a long time to get the project finished (if you can even pair up price and quality to begin with). And if you want something done quickly and cheaply, you’ll likely pay for it with a low quality job.

In this case, beware the contractor who offers “fast” paint removal from brick. The only way you’ll get fast paint removal from brick is at the cost of compromising the very integrity of your masonry. This is where blasting brick to remove paint comes in. Blasting brick is a great way to remove paint “fast.” What it does to the brick? Not so great.

2. Brick valleys

Masonry, even the old “soft” brick is a pretty smooth building material. It doesn’t have ridges and valleys, like what we see here, once the damage has been done.

They had the blaster set to "destroy" for this job. Notice how the horizontal lines extend along the same level, from one brick to another? This was caused by the blasting material (in this case, water), the proximity of the tool to the surface (too close), and the pressure of the blasting.

They had the blaster set to “destroy” for this job. Notice how the horizontal lines extend along the same level, from one brick to another? This was caused by the blasting material (in this case, water), the proximity of the tool to the surface (too close), and the pressure of the blasting.

When the hard outer shell of the brick has been removed, you’re left with a much softer interior. Soft interiors+freeze/thaw cycles=bad news. But, while the structural integrity of the brick has been compromised, at least the paint’s gone!

Bye bye paint, bye bye brick crust, bye bye brick integrity.

Bye bye paint, bye bye brick crust, bye bye brick integrity.

3. Nozzles and brick: up close and personal
Now, it’s not that we frown upon anything harsher than cotton balls dipped in warm water, delicately rubbed back in forth in a gentle, circular motion, to cure what ills your brick. It’s just that there’s this wide gulf of possibility between too gentle and too harsh. Yes, you can loosen flaking paint with water jets. But, you have to be careful that the pressure setting won’t harm your brick. You also have to be mindful that water, as the sworn enemy of historic buildings, will do bad things if it gets into the building. And, even a low setting too close to the wall can be bad for your brick. A high setting too close to the wall is more like fatal for your brick.

As preservationists, we should all savor the opportunities to educate people about the wonderful assets they have, and that the care and maintenance of elderly buildings is best left to restoration professionals.

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Cincinnati’s Music Hall receives catalytic tax credit award

Attribution: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Hannaford#mediaviewer/File:Cincinnati_Music_Hall_2002a.jpg

Attribution: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Hannaford#mediaviewer/File:Cincinnati_Music_Hall_2002a.jpg

Music Hall in Cincinnati was the big winner in the latest round of tax credit awards named yesterday. You can read more from ODSA’s press release here.

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The 10% (residential) tax credit…no, really! Pt II

We left off with my promise to share what I found out about the 10% tax credit, and just what you could or couldn’t do with it when it comes residential rehabilitation.

I started by checking out Form 3468 from the IRS, the form you attach to your return (you can view a PDF of the form here). One definite advantage to the 10% credit is the fact that there’s no 3-part process involving the SHPO, the National Park Service, the IRS, and your raft of consultants (depending on the complexity of your project). You report your 10% credit on a three-page form that you include in your annual return. And really, it’s one line multiplying your Qualified Rehabilitation Expenditures by 10%, and entering that total on the last line of the form.

In consulting the 2013 Instructions for Form 3468 (which you can find here) because nothing with the IRS is as easy as writing the total in one line, we learn that the Qualified Rehabilitation Expenditures have to be for “nonresidential rental property.” So what exactly does that mean? Sorry, the IRS can’t be bothered with including definitions for common terms used on the form. That would be…helpful.

What if you could use the 10% tax credit on redevelopment projects that included a residential component?

There’s that same building again, only bigger.

However; undaunted, and hot on the trail of this mystery, I google “nonresidential rental property definition” and then I google “residential rental property definition” which brings me to the next IRS publication. IRS Publication 527 covers residential rental property (yep, I’ve got your link for it here) and the IRS gets into property classes. While the classes don’t include “nonresidential rental property,” we do get a definition for “residential rental property” as follows:

This class includes any real property that is a rental building or structure (including a mobile home) for which 80% or more of the gross rental income for the tax year is from
dwelling units….

So, does that mean the inverse applies for the definition of nonresidential rental property? As long as less than 80% of your income comes from dwelling units, is your property defined as nonresidential rental property in the eyes of the IRS? I kept searching.

A fair amount of googling later, I came upon IRS Publication 946, which delves into property depreciation (you glutton…here you go) and the good folks at the IRS included a glossary in the publication. Their definition for residential rental property (sorry, nothing under the Ns for nonresidential rental property) is:

Real property, generally buildings or structures, if 80% or more of its annual gross rental income is from dwelling units.

So, again, do we flip greater than 80% for less than 80% to come to the definition of nonresidential rental property? And, anyway, why should we really care?

And the answer is that there is a lot of potential for the renovation of old, mixed-use commercial buildings, 2- 3- or 4-story, that could use the 10% rehab tax credit, but that don’t, leaving serious incentive money on the table. According to the IRS, as long as less than 80% of your income comes from the residential portion of your building, the IRS categorizes it as nonresidential rental property, and appears to be eligible for the 10% tax credit. And on a $100,000 rehab project, that’s an extra $10,000 in the developer’s pocket at the end. Not bad for filling out a couple lines on your tax return.

Now, since I’m not a lawyer or tax advisor, I’m afraid all I can do is whip you into a frenzy over incentive dollars you could be taking advantage of (or did all the IRS publications already do that?) so please don’t take this as a substitute for consulting your own favorite tax person or lawyer.

If you have your own two cents, or 10%, to contribute to the conversation, I’d love to hear from you. Have you successfully taken the 10% credit on a project with a residential component? Have you uncovered that elusive definition of nonresidential rental property that you would be willing to share? Thanks for reading!

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