mission

Del Monte Easement

341 South Third St,
Columbus, OH 43215

 

Last year at this time we were putting the finishing touches on an easement for the Del Monte Building in Columbus (no relation to the company supplying your bananas!) While many of our easements are taken on large commercial buildings in downtown areas, the Del Monte is a smaller example. Originally built as a six-unit apartment building in the early 1900s, the building served a need for living units as Columbus experienced a growth phase during the first quarter of the twentieth century.

The Del Monte is a handsome three-story masonry building with a buff stone foundation and simple cornice. The building features numerous window openings, so even in the early 1900s, the units must have had a light and airy feeling.

Joyce Barrett commented on the positive impact of the easement: “Even modest downtown buildings can benefit from the owner placing an easement on the property, making this a win-win for the owner and for preservationists. In the case of the Del Monte Building, we’ve ensured that a historic building not under local design review will be preserved and enjoyed for generations to come. And the owner can receive a tax deduction for donating the easement.”

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Protected: Revitalize Ohio Winter 2017

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A Brief History of Columbus

October 11th, 2017 1 pm – 2 pm

Join Heritage Ohio and Columbus historian Ed Lentz for a webinar discussing some of the interesting histories of Ohio’s capital city. In preparation for Heritage Ohio’s Annual Conference the following week, learn a little about the city we will be exploring during various tours offered.

Heritage Ohio Members Register Here

Not a Member? Join Heritage Ohio now to get access.

 

Ed Lentz has been teaching, writing and exploring the history of Central Ohio for more than fifty years. When not doing that sort of thing, he teaches from time to time at various local colleges and universities. He writes for local newspapers, consults in history and historic preservation and keeps company with his wife, two cats and occasionally visiting two children.

Ed worked at the Ohio Historical Society for a number of years and was Executive Director of the Columbus Landmarks Foundation from 1983 to 1988 and from 2013 to 2017.

Mr. Lentz holds degrees in history from Princeton University and The Ohio State University. He has written a weekly column on Columbus history for the This Week Community Newspapers since 1992. He has been Historical Consultant to Columbus Neighborhoods programming on WOSU Public Media since 2010. He is the author of several books, including Columbus – The Story of a City ( 2003), A Home of Their Own (2010) and Historic Columbus (2012).

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The Most Stunning Historic Theatres in Ohio

We love seeing historic theatres restored in Ohio to their former glory and once again a proud centerpiece of the community. Can you believe some of these theatres were once threatened with demolition to make way for parking lots? Thanks to the work of preservationists across the state, you can still visit these stunning Ohio historic theatres.

Northwest

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Ritz Theater in Tiffin

photo via Tiffin Arts

The Ritz Theatre – Tiffin

The Ritz Theatre opened to great fanfare in December of 1928 in downtown Tiffin. The theatre’s design takes elements from the Italian Renaissance, including an artistic interpretation of a Roman villa in the concert hall. The theatre was renovated in 1998, bringing the theatre back to its original charm and elegance.

Today, the theatre offers a variety of performances including live music, classic films, and theatrical pieces. See the current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Holland Theater Bellefontaine

photo via The Holland Theater

The Holland Theatre – Bellefontaine

The Holland Theatre is one of the more uniquely designed theatres in Ohio. Both inside and out, the theatre transport the visitor to Holland, with classic Flemish design, including a dutch village-scape in the interior. The theatre opened in 1931 as The Schine’s Holland Theatre. While some alterations have occurred over the years, much of the original splendor of the theatre is intact and ready to wow.

With numerous performance throughout the year, you will have plenty of opportunities to visit the theatre. See the current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Sandusky State Theater

photo via cleveland.com

The Sandusky State Theatre – Sandusky

The Sandusky State Theatre opened in 1938 as The Schine Theatre with a showing of Night Watch. The theatre fell into disrepair in the 1960s, but was extensively renovated in 1990. Theatre hosted a performance of Michael Bolton to celebrate its 75th anniversary. For its centennial anniversary, the Sandusky State Theatre hopes to be completely renovated to its original splendor.

The Sandusky State Theatre offers a wide variety of programming. See their upcoming events here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Pemberville Opera House

photo via The Pemberville Opera House

The Pemberville Opera House – Pemberville

Resting on the second floor of the Pemberville Town Hall, the Pemberville Opera House opened to Jeptha’s Daughter, an adaptation of the Biblical story. The opera house was wildly popular in before WWII, especially after electric lights were added in 1899. Following years of neglect, renovations were started in 1998 to return the opera house to use.

Today, the Pemberville Opera House hosts several productions every year. See their current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Huber Opera House in Hicksville

photo via Hicksville Chamber of Commerce

The Huber Opera House & Event Center – Hicksville

The Huber Opera House started life as Mackey’s Brick Hotel in downtown Hicksville in 1882. After a fire destroyed the Pettit Opera House, the hotel was converted to an opera house in 1895. The opera house remained the center of community life well into the 1970s, before it became rundown. In 1999, a coalition of community members and businesses purchased the opera house, giving it a new lease on life.

You have plenty of opportunities to visit The Huber Opera House. See their current schedule here.

 

Southwest

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Victoria Theater in Dayton

photo via Cinema Treasures

The Victoria Theatre – Dayton

The Victoria Theatre in Dayton traces its roots to The Turner Opera House, opened in 1866. The Turner only existed a few years before being destroyed in a fire. After the opera house was rebuilt, it underwent a series of name changes: The Music Hall in 1871, The Grand Opera House in 1885, The Victoria Opera House in 1899, and The Victoria Theatre in 1902. After surviving the Flood of 1913, another fire destroyed the building in 1918. After being rebuilt, it became The Victory Theatre. It thrived up into the late 1950s, but was marked for demolition in 1972. The community stepped up to save the theatre and the Victory Theatre Association began renovations in 1976. The theatre was transferred to the Arts Center Association in 1988 and was renamed again, back to The Victoria Theatre.

The Victoria Theatre offers extensive programming throughout the year. You can see their current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Murphy Theater in Wilmington

photo via The Murphy Theater

The Murphy Theatre – Wilmington

The Murphy Theatre opened in downtown Wilmington in 1918. After operating as a Vaudeville theater, it was leased to Chakeres Theaters in 1929. In 1989, the theatre was purchased by a local group of citizens who sold stock options to save the theatre. Since the great work of these enterprising citizens, the Murphy Theatre continues to operate to this day.

The Murphy Theatre has numerous films and presentations every month. See their current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio -The Baum Opera House

photo via The Baum Opera House

The Baum Opera House – Miamisburg

The Star City Opera House was constructed by German immigrant Charles Baum in 1884, and quickly became the epicenter of life in Miamisburg. Like many other theaters and opera houses after WWII, it went through a series of name changes and uses, including housing a dinner theater, bowling alley, skating rink, and a few bars. It was slated for demolition in the early 1990s, but was purchased at a Sheriff’s sale. Since then, the Baum Opera House Association has managed the opera house and has fully renovated and restored the space to its former glory.

The Baum Opera House hosts several plays, musicals, and dances throughout the year. See their current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Cincinnati Music Hall

photographer unknown

The Cincinnati Music Hall – Cincinnati

Music Hall opened with a performance of Christoph Willibald Gluck’s Alceste in 1878. More commonly known as Cincinnati Music Hall, the concert hall is the defining structure of Washington Park in Cincinnati. With the decline of the Over-The-Rhine neighborhood, Music Hall’s future came into doubt. It was listed on the 2006 National Trust for Historic Preservation‘s 11 Most Endangered List. Through a grant from the City of Cincinnati, The Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program, and the generous donations of thousands of people, Music Hall has recently been renovated and will continue to serenade Cincinnati.

To see the current schedule of events at Music Hall, click here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Majestic Theater in Chillicothe

photo via Chillicothe Visitors Bureau

The Majestic Theatre – Chillicothe

The building that currently houses The Majestic Theatre was built in 1853 as a Masonic Hall. In 1876, the Masons designed an opera house to be built within the Masonic Hall. This opera house became the foundation for The Majestic. In 1904, the Masonic Hall and Opera House were sold, and sold again in 1915. The new owners changed the name of the theater to The Majestic Theatre and it soon became a cinema. After a sale of the building in the 1970s, the structure was renovated, and in 1990, the current non-profit association took control of the theatre.

Today, the theatre still shows films, as well as live performances. You can see the theatre’s full schedule of events here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Paxton Theater in Bainbridge

photo via Pinterest

Paxton Theatre – Bainbridge

The Paxton Theatre is located on the upper floor of the Paxton Township Hall, opening around 1910. Soon after opening, the space was leased to show motion pictures, continuing under different operators until the early 1950s. In later years it was used as rental and entertainment space. In 1992, it was sold to host the Paint Valley Jamboree, which still takes place in the theatre. The building was recently sold and the current owners plan to make it the center of the community for years to come.

The Paxton Theatre continues to host the Paint Valley Jamboree, as well as numerous other musical guests and Shrek Jr. See all of the Paxton’s events here.

 

Central

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Ohio Theater in Columbus

photo via CAPA

The Ohio Theatre – Columbus

The Spanish Baroque-style Ohio Theatre opened as a Loew’s movie house in 1928. Opening at the end of the silent era of film, the theatre boasted its own orchestra and theater organ. The Ohio remained a cinema until the early 1960s and was threated with demolition by the end of the decade. The citizen-led “Save the Ohio’ campaign raised over $2M in less than a year and the Columbus Association for Performing Arts (CAPA) purchased the theatre. Today, the Ohio Theatre is the crown jewel of Columbus theatres, and hosts The Columbus Symphony Orchestra, BalletMet, The Broadway Series, and more than 100 CAPA events each year.

See CAPAs current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Midland Theater in Newark

photo via Midland Theater

The Midland Theatre – Newark

Opened in 1928, The Midland Theatre began its life showing Vaudeville shows and silent films. Interestingly, it was only a week later that the theatre premiered its first “talkie”. The theatre quickly transitioned into a full-time cimema, rotating films on a 3-day schedule. After years of decline, the theatre closed after the Blizzard of ’78 killed the boiler in the theatre. In 1992, The Longaberger Company purchased the theatre and renovated it. It entrusted the theatre to The Newark Midland Theatre Association to be stewards to the theatre and to provide quality programming for Newark.

Today, The Midland Theatre shows a variety of performances including live music and musicals. To see the Midland’s schedule, click here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Southern Theater in Columbus

photo via CAPA

The Southern Theatre – Columbus

Just a few blocks south of The Ohio Theatre is another fantastic theater in downtown Columbus. Opened in 1896, the Great Southern Fireproof Hotel and Opera House filled a large gap in theaters in downtown. In the years prior to construction, 5 theaters were lost to fires in just 4 years. Other than being “fireproof”, meaning it was constructed with “fireproof” tile, brick, iron, steel, and concrete, the theatre was one of the first commercial buildings in Columbus to use electric lighting. In 1931, the theatre was converted to a cinema. After years of struggling, the theatre was closed in 1979. In 1982, the Great Southern Hotel was purchased and the owners offered the theatre to CAPA. After a combined effort of state and city funding, as well as donations from numerous donors and businesses, the Southern Theatre reopened in 1998.

See CAPAs current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio- The Marion Palace Theater

photo via Midwest Meetings

The Marion Palace Theatre – Marion

The Marion Palace opened as a cinema and Vaudeville theater in 1928, premiering with 4 Vaudeville acts and the film, Excess Baggage. The theatre is designed in Spanish Colonial Revival-style, and has several Roman and Greek statues designed by Pietro Caproni. Following several successful years as a cinema and multiple owners, the theatre needed extensive work to maintain its splendor. In the mid-1970s, a group of business owners, dubbed The Palace Guard, started a funding campaign to revitalize the theatre. The Palace Cultural Arts Association has operated the Marion Palace Theatre since then, and continues to provide new and exciting performances for Marion.

The Marion Palace Theatre shows films and live performances several times a month. See their schedule here.

 

photo via CAPA

The Lincoln Theatre – Columbus

Located just to the east of downtown Columbus, in the historic African-American neighborhood of King-Lincoln Bronzeville, is The Lincoln Theatre. Opened in 1928 as The Ogden Theatre, the Egyptian Revival theatre originally was used for Vaudeville performances and musical acts, but quickly transitioned into a cinema. It was renamed The Lincoln Theatre in 1939. Following several hard years, the theatre was closed in the early 1970s. The theatre reopened in 2009, with funding assistance from The City of Columbus and Federal Historic Preservation Tax Credits, and was widely seen as a catalytic revitalization project for the neighborhood.

See CAPAs current schedule here.

 

Northeast

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Akron Civic Theater

photo via Akron.com

The Akron Civic Theatre – Akron

In 1919, construction of a new theatre began in downtown Akron called The Hippodrome. In addition to a theatre, there were 30 planned shops inside an arcade. The project went bankrupt before it was complete. Soon after, Marcus Loew purchased the partially constructed Hippodrome and completed the newest Loew’s Theatre in Akron, designed by architect John Eberson. The interior is designed to resemble a Moorish castle, with Mediterranean elements throughout and is only one of a handful of surviving atmospheric theaters. After several ownership changes and nearly becoming a parking lot in the 1960s, the Akron Civic Theatre was extensively renovated in 2001, it reopened to fanfare with a new partnership with The University of Akron.

The Akron Civic Theatre has many live performances each month. See their current schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Brecksville Theater

photo by Heritage Ohio

The Brecksville Theatre – Brecksville

The Old Brecksville Town Hall was built in 1874. In the 1940s, performances by the Brecksville Little Theatre began to be held in the town hall building. Paul Newman, yes, that Paul Newman, directed the comedy, Here Today in 1951 there. In 1975, a second theater group, Theater on the Square was established. Tragically, the old town hall was damaged in a fire in 1976, but was repaired. In 2017, it was announced the two theater groups were merging into The Brecksville Theatre and will continue to perform in the old town hall.

The new Brecksville Theatre has several shows lined up this fall. See the schedule here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Canton Palace Theater

photo via Visit Canton

The Canton Palace Theatre – Canton 

Like The Marion Palace Theatre and The Akron Civic Theatre, The Canton Palace Theatre was designed in a Spanish Colonial Revival style. It is also one of a few surviving atmospheric theatres. The Canton Palace Theatre opened in 1926 as a movie house and Vaudeville theatre. After a period of decline, the theatre closed on its 50th anniversary in 1976 and was soon scheduled for demolition. The Canton Jaycees saved the building and held it in trust until The Canton Palace Theatre Association was formed to operate the theatre. It reopened in 1980 and over $4M in renovations have taken place.

The Canton Palace Theatre continues to show films and have live performances. Their schedule of events can be viewed here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Capitol Theater in Cleveland

photo via Capitol Theater

The Gordon Square Arts District – Cleveland

The Gordon Square Arts District composes three theatres in the Detroit Shoreway: The Capitol Theatre, The Cleveland Public Theatre, and The Near West Theatre.

The Capitol Theatre opened in 1921 as part of the Gordon Square Arcade. As new cinemas arose, the arcade and theatre declined. A parapet collapsed in 1978, damaging both the arcade and Capitol. It was slated for demolition, but the building was saved by the Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization. The Capitol closed in 1985. It was reopened in 2009 with the help of Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits, and become a catalyst toward neighborhood redevelopment.

The Cleveland Public Theatre was founded in 1981. In 1994-95, The Cleveland Public Theatre moved into two adjoining buildings on Detroit Avenue, including The former Gordon Square Theatre building, one of Cleveland’s oldest standing theatres.

The Near West Theatre sprang to life in 1978, using the third-floor ballroom of the St. Patrick Church Club Building as performance space. The newly constructed Near West Theatre building in The Gordon Square Arts District opened in 2015.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Lions Lincoln Theater

photo via Lions Lincoln Theater

Lions Lincoln Theatre – Massillon

The Lincoln Theatre opened in 1915 during the silent era of film. It switched ownership several times during its life as a cinema. By the late 1970s, it was closed and waiting to be demolished. The Massillon Lions Club acquired the theatre in 1982, saving it from destruction. After extensive renovations, the Lions Lincoln Theatre was reopened and continues to entertain audiences.

The Lions Lincoln Theatre currently shows classic films and live performances. To see their current schedule, click here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Historic Ohio Theater Loudonville

photo via The Historic Ohio Theater

The Historic Ohio Theatre – Loudonville

The neoclassical Loudonville Municipal Hall and Opera House opened in 1910, with the opera house located at the rear of the building. The first performance at the opera house was The Flaming Arrow. The opera house was renamed The Ohio Theatre in 1931. Renovations of the theatre are ongoing with fundraising for a new lighting system underway.

The Ohio Theatre currently has live performances and movies. View their current line-up here.

 

photo via Playhouse Square

Playhouse Square – Cleveland

Playhouse Square, the “world’s largest theater restoration project,” and the country’s largest performing arts center outside New York City, composes 5 historic theatres: The Allen Theatre, The Hanna Theatre, The Ohio Theatre, The Palace Theatre, and The State Theatre. Playhouse Square draws more than 1 million people annually to its 10 performance spaces while contributing in excess of $43 million in local economic impact every year exclusively from its performing arts activity

The Allen Theatre opened in 1921 as an Italian Renaissance silent movie house. The first film shown at The Allen was The Greatest Love starring Vera Gordon. It continued to show films until it closed in 1968. It was reopened in 1994 and underwent renovations in 1998 and 2011.

The Hanna Theatre opened in 1921 with a performance of Mark Twain’s The Prince and The Pauper. The theatre was designed in French Imperial style. It closed in 1988. It was reopened in 1997 and was fully renovated in 2008.

The Ohio Theatre was designed as an Italian Renaissance theatre. It opened in 1921 with a performance of The Return of Peter Grimm. It closed in 1969 and was reopened in 1982.

The Palace Theatre was opened in 1922 as a French Imperial-styled Vaudeville theatre. It was adapted to show films in 1926. It closed in 1969 and reopened in 1988 as The Connor Palace Theatre.

The State Theatre opened as an Italian Renaissance Loew’s theatre. The first film show was Polly with a Past. The theatre contains 4 murals by James Daugherty and a 320-foot long lobby, one of the longest in the world. The theatre closed in 1969. It was nearly demolished with The Ohio Theatre in 1972, which led to the revival of Playhouse Square. The KeyBank State Theatre reopened in 1984.

To view current events for Playhouse Square, click here.

 

Southeast

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Markay Theater in Jackson

photo via WOUB

The Markay Cultural Arts Center – Jackson

The Markay Theater opened in 1930 with a showing of Playboy of Paris. The Art Deco theatre features 6 prominent panels depicting life in Jackson. It closed in the early 1990s, but reopened with the help of the Southern Hills Arts Council in 1997. An extensive renovation of the theatre took place and a grand reopening of the theatre occurred in 2015.

Currently, the Markay has several live performances and classic films. For a complete list of events, click here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The People's Bank Theater

photo via People’s Bank Theater

Peoples Bank Theatre – Marietta

The Hippodrome Theatre opened in downtown Marietta in 1919 as a Vaudeville theatre and movie house with a showing of the film, Daddy-Long-Legs. In 1949, it was renamed the Colony Cinema. In 1957, it hosted the world premiere of Battle Hymn, starring Rock Hudson. The Colony Cinema had numerous ownership changes and ultimately closed in 1985. The Hippodrome/Colony Theatre Association spent 15 years raising funds for the theatre, including an Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit for the project. Peoples Bank Theatre reopened in 2016 and hosted the State of the State address the same year.

Peoples Bank Theatre hosts live performances and film viewings. View their full line-up here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Stuart's Opera House

photo via Stuart’s Opera House

Stuart’s Opera House – Nelsonville

Stuart’s Opera House opened in 1879 and was named after George Stuart. It continued operating until 1924, when the local coal economy crashed, bring down the opera house with it.  In 1977, the Hocking Valley Museum of Theatrical History bought the opera house and  began to restore the historic property. Following a fire in 1980, the process of restoring the property was begun anew. The opera house was officially reopened in 1997, after 20 years of hard-fought restoration work.

Stuart’s Opera House offers a variety of live performances to the Nelsonville community. For the current list of events, click here.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - Twin City Opera House

photo via Twin City Opera House

Twin City Opera House – McConnelsville

The Twin City Opera House opened in the late spring of 1892 to Gilbert and Sullivan’s “The Mikado”, sharing space in the mammoth building with the McConnelsville town hall. Nearly 20 years after opening, the first silent movies were shown in the opera house, and the first sound system was installed around 1930 using Vitaphone technology. In 1936, the opera house was updated to install sound projectors and renovate the auditorium to accommodate a new projection booth. This was the only time the opera house was closed to the public in its long history.

The Twin City Opera House continues to show films and hosts live performances, including The Ohio Valley Opry. Check full schedule for details of upcoming performances.

 

Best Historic Theatres in Ohio - The Ariel Opera House

photo via Ariel Opera House

The Ariel Opera House – Gallipolis

The Ariel Opera House opened in 1895, just blocks from the Ohio River in downtown Gallipolis. After struggling in the post-WWII era, the opera house closed in the 1960s. Local citizens, led by local professional musician Lora Lynn Snow, banded together in the late 1980s to restore the opera house, and it reopened in 1990, becoming home to The Ohio Valley Symphony. In 2006, the Ariel was rededicated as The Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre, after local resident Ann Carson Dater purchased the opera house and presented it to the community as a permanent home for The Ohio Valley Symphony and for use as a performing arts center.

The Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre continues to be the home of the Ohio Valley Symphony and has theatrical performances as well. See their current events here.

 

 

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Best Ice Cream in Ohio: Local Shops to Sample this Summer

July is National Ice Cream Month, established by President Ronald Reagan in 1984. To celebrate this quasi-month-long holiday, we discovered and sampled some of Ohio’s best ice creams (jealous yet?). So here is Heritage Ohio’s list of the best ice cream parlors in Ohio.

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Dietsch Brothers

photo via TripAdvisor

Dietsch Brothers Fine Chocolates & Ice Cream – Findlay

Dietsch Brothers has been serving ice cream and chocolates using family recipes since 1937. The popular Findlay store has been repeatedly named a “Top 10 Ice Cream Shop” by TripAdvisor and their chocolate-covered pretzels are a favorite of Bette Midler. In addition to ice cream cones, the store offers a variety of sundaes, old-fashioned sodas, and a unique banana split.

Locations

400 W. Main Cross St. & 1217 Tiffin Ave., Findlay

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio- Aglamesis Brothers

photo via Cincinnati USA

Aglamesis Brothers – Cincinnati

A Cincinnati tradition since 1908, Aglamesis Brothers is an ice cream lover’s paradise. The Oakley Square location, opened in 1913, is mostly unchanged since its opening, decorated with bright colors and warm marble. Beyond the traditional ice cream flavors you would expect are several creative flavors including pineapple pecan and banana chocolate chip. They also offer a good selection of Italian ices.

Locations

3046 Madison Rd. & 9899 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Jeni's Ice Cream

photo via Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream

Jeni’s Spledid Ice Creams – Columbus & Cleveland

James Beard Award winner Jeni Britton Bauer opened her first scoop shop in 2002, offering what was at the time a truly innovative approach to ice cream making. Ice cream at Jeni’s is made from grass-fed cow milk and whole ingredients, as well as a whole lot of creativity. The stores offer classic Jeni’s flavors like salty caramel and the milkiest chocolate in the whole wide world, as well a rotating collections of ice cream that offer some truly unique flavors such as sweet corn with black raspberry and banana with honey. We may be biased as Columbus locals, but we think this is some of the best ice cream in Ohio. This isn’t your ordinary ice cream parlor and should be a destination for any true ice cream lover.

Numerous Locations in Columbus & Cleveland

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Mitchell's Homemade Ice Cream

photo via Mitchell’s Homemade Ice Cream

Mitchell’s Homemade Ice Cream – Cleveland

After an evening of fruitlessly hunting for homemade ice cream in Seattle in the 1990s, Mike & Pete Mitchell decided to make the “best, most delicious ice cream.” They opened their first store in Westlake in 1999 and have been serving Cleveland ever since. The stores offer ice cream classics and unique flavors like porter chocolate chunk and vegan offerings as well. The Ohio City location offers several flavors that you can only find at that store, which is also an Ohio Historic Tax Credit project. Simply put, the next time you are in Cleveland, visit a Mitchell’s store and thank us later.

7 Locations in the Cleveland Metro Area

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Tom's Ice Cream Bowl

photo via Tom’s Ice Cream Bowl

Tom’s Ice Cream Bowl – Zanesville

Tom’s has been a Zanesville fixture since 1948. The shop has a great retro vibe to it, inviting you to eat more ice cream. Tom’s offers a good variety of classic ice cream flavors, but many people go for the over-the-top sundaes. Either way, you’ll be happy you stopped by.

Location

532 McIntire Ave., Zanesville

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Graeters at Union Terminal

photo via Thought & Sight

Graeter’s Ice Cream – Numerous Locations

When people talk about Cincinnati ice cream, you’ll undoubtedly hear that Graeter’s is the best ice cream in Ohio. Graeter’s traces its ice cream history back to 1868 when Louis Graeter started selling ice cream at street markets in Cincinnati. Starting in 1900, he and his wife started making ice cream using French Pots and the technique is still used by the company today. Vanilla and black raspberry chocolate chip are local favorites, but we suggest you try them all.

Locations in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, & Oxford

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Taggarts

photo via Thought & Sight on Instagram

Taggarts Ice Cream Parlor & Restaurant – Canton

Opened in 1926, Taggarts has been a family favorite since day 1. The restaurant offers a large selection of soups and sandwiches, but the ice cream takes center stage here. The most popular item is ‘The Bittner’, a 3/4 lb. sundae of vanilla ice cream blended with chocolate syrup and topped with roasted pecans. Absolutely delicious.

Locations

1401 Fulton Rd. NW, Canton & 107 S. Main St., Magnolia

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio

photo via Queen City Discovery

The Cone – West Chester

The origin story of The Cone has to be one of the more unique tales in Ohio ice cream lore. The owner wanted to open a new and unique ice cream store. When his parents were vacationing in Florida, they happened upon a ice cream cone-shaped building for sale. He purchased it, brought it back to Ohio and opened The Cone in 1995. The Cone is known for their soft-serve ice cream, especially the strawberry, made with real strawberries. The ice cream and shaved ice menu is extensive, so you will have no trouble finding something to put a smile on your face.

Location

6855 Tylersville Rd., West Chester

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Hartzler Family Dairy

photo via One Tank Trips

Hartzler Family Dairy – Wooster

Just a few miles northeast of historic downtown Wooster is the Hartzler Family Dairy. The farm operates on the principle of “farming as nature intended,” so you won’t find dairy products made with antibiotics or pesticides used on crops. The family opened the dairy in 1996 to meet the demand for high quality dairy products. Hartzler’s Ice Cream Shoppe sells both food and ice cream. The centerpiece is the Barn Buster Parfait, an oversized hot fudge sundae with vanilla custard. Delicious.

Location

5454 Cleveland Rd., Wooster

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Stoddards Frozen Custard

photo via Stoddard’s

Stoddard’s Original Frozen Custard – Kent

OK, ice cream purists, custard is not ice cream. But that shouldn’t stop you from visiting Stoddard’s, just outside of downtown Kent. To be clear, the shop does have ice cream too, but people absolutely love the frozen custard at this ice cream stand since it opened in 1948. It’s super creamy and delicious

Location

1321 W. Main St., Kent

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Weldon's Ice Cream Factory

photo via Weldon’s Ice Cream

Weldon’s Ice Cream Factory – Millersport

Buckeye Lake is a popular summer destination for thousands of Ohioans each year. What many people who are visiting don’t know is there is a wonderful ice cream parlor on the southwest shore of the lake in Millersport. Weldon’s opened in 1930 and continues to churn out the same delicious ice cream.

Location

2887 Canal Dr., Millersport

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio

photo via Citymaps

Bidinger’s Ice Cream – Wadsworth

Heading towards downtown Wadsworth on College Street, you’ll be greeted by a giant ice cream cone, letting you know you’ve arrived at Bidinger’s. The stand offers both hard-packed and soft-serve ice cream, but may astonish any visitor is the variety. Across the year, the store offers an ever-growing list of rotating soft-serve flavors including toasted coconut, creme brulee, and key lime, with all varieties available in a twist as well.

Location

410 College St., Wadsworth

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Honey Hut

photo via Honey Hut

Honey Hut Ice Cream – Cleveland

Honey Hut opened in 1974 with two flavors, vanilla and chocolate. The menu options soon expanded with the owner testing out new flavors on local firefighters. Today, you will find local favorites such as honey pecan on the menu, in addition to vanilla and chocolate, as well as other frozen treats to try.

5 Locations in the Cleveland Metro Area

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Cherry St Creamery

photo via Cherry St Creamery

Oser’s Dairy & Deli and Cherry Street Creamery – Canal Fulton

W are sure we’re committing a major faux-pas in the minds of locals, but we’re going to sit on the fence and say both Oser’s and Cherry Street Creamery are great. The two shops are located on opposite sides of the Ohio & Erie Canal that runs through the middle of Canal Fulton. Cherry Street Creamery is for fans of fresh-made custard and Oser’s serves hard ice cream devotees. Visit Canal Fulton and pick a side in this ice cream battle.

Location

Cherry Street Creamery, 136 Cherry St. W., Canal Fulton

Oser’s Dairy & Deli, 102 N. Canal St., Canal Fulton

 

Bonus: International Ice Creams

Tucked away in your city are many hidden ice cream gems you may have not discovered yet. We are talking about ethnic ice cream stands. You may have to find them by exploring your city or by word-of-mouth, but when you do find them, don’t be afraid to try them. They are always amazing. Since we are in Columbus, we will highlight just a few in our area that we think you should try, but find the ones closest to you! If you’re looking for more offbeat things to do in Columbus, Choosy Traveler has the lowdown on one of our favorite quirky statues.

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio- Diamond's Mexican Paletas

photo via fitt.co

Diamonds specializes in Mexican ice cream, fruit desserts, and authentic paletas. The ice cream is excellent, but you really want to go for the paletas, which you will recognize as a popsicle, but a popsicle that is better than any normal popsicle you’ve had. Trust us. They come in a wide variety of flavors and are either milk-based or water/juice-based. There are dozens to pick from, so go wild and get a few to try.

Location

4561 Bethel Sawmill Center, Columbus

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Belles Bread Matcha Soft Serve

photo via Thought & Sight on Instagram

This Japanese bakery is part of a larger Japanese menagerie of shops and restaurants in the Kenny Centre Mall. The store offers amazing cakes and baked goods, but they also offer soft-serve ice cream. You can get vanilla, matcha, or matcha-vanilla swirl flavors. For those of you who want the full Japanese experience, we suggest getting a matcha ice, which is shaved ice with matcha syrup, condensed milk, and azuki beans topped with matcha ice cream. Absolutely delicious.

Location

1168 Kenny Centre Mall, Columbus

 

Best Ice Cream in Ohio - Mardi Gras Indian Ice Cream

photo via WOSU

This Indian ice cream store has some of the creamiest ice cream you are going to find anywhere. They have the classic American flavors as well as a dozen or so Indian flavors such as rose, anjeer (fig), lychee, and Kesar Pista, a blend of pistachio, almond, saffron, and a pinch of cardamom. It’s some of the best ice cream we’ve had in Ohio. The owners are very proud of their ice cream and will let you sample them all to get the right one for you.

Location

1947 Hard Rd., Columbus

 

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Go Outside and Play: Ohio’s 23 Best Parks

 

Northeast Ohio

photo via National Park Service

Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Cuyahoga Valley National Park is Ohio’s only national park, but you couldn’t ask for a better example of Ohio’s natural splendor. Just a short drive south of downtown Cleveland, Cuyahoga Valley has plenty to offer any visitor. A few highlights of the park are the 65-foot high Brandywine Falls, the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad, and the historic village of Peninsula.

 

Ohio’s National Park covers 33,000 acres of parkland, leaving you and your family many weekends of exploration.

 

photo via Summit Metro Parks

Liberty Park – Twinsburg

Just outside of Twinsburg is one of the hidden gems of Northeast Ohio. Liberty Park has a diverse offering of natural spaces for a suburban park. Visitors will delight in the natural beauty of the Tinkers Creek Nature Preserve and the towering Twinsburg Ledges area, both located in the park. You can explore both and more on the numerous trails within the park.

 

photo via TripAdvisor

Holden Arboretum

Holden Arboretum is just a short drive from historic downtown Chardon in Geauga County. The arboretum will be a unique experience for many visitors, including Ohioans. Some of the many offerings of the Holden Arboretum include a butterfly garden, several rhododendron gardens, a hedge collection, and the famous Canopy Walk.

 

photo via Mill Creek Metroparks

Mill Creek Park

It may be hard to believe, but Mill Creek Park in Youngstown rivals other large metropolitan parks like Central Park in terms of absolute beauty and depth. The sprawling park covers 4,400 acres and has diverse areas and topography. Highlights of the park for new visitors include Lanterman’s Mill, several historic bridges, the Wall Garden, and many archaeological sites from Youngstown’s steel-making history.

 

photo via Panaramio

Franklin Mills Riveredge Park

Located in downtown Kent, Franklin Mills Riveredge Park is small compared with other parks on this list, but will surprise you with its design and features. The main focus of the park in the Cuyahoga River with an arched stone dam. You can explore the river along a boardwalk that follows the river. There are plenty of observation areas, as well as benches and tables to enjoy your day in downtown Kent.

 

photo via Trek Ohio

Bonus: Killbuck Marsh

Located between Millersburg and Wooster, Killbuck Marsh is a hidden gem just south of Route 30. The area has an extensive natural history, and several Ice Age animals such as mastodon have been unearthed. Some of these animals can be seen at the Killbuck Valley Museum, just down the road.

 

Southeast Ohio

photo via Ron Skinner

Hocking Hills State Park

Hocking Hills is quite possibly the most famous of all the Ohio State Parks. Within minutes of arriving, you will certainly see why. The park is divided into five sections, but really they are parks within parks and all worth a visit. Absolute must-see features include the falls at Old Man’s Cave, the Cantwell Cliffs, and the nearby Conkle’s Hollow State Nature Preserve.

Beyond the parks, there are rustic cabins to stay in the area and lots of unique small towns to explore.

photo via Ohio DNR

Lake Hope State Park

Just south of Hocking Hills State Park is Lake Hope. The park is encapsulated by Zaleski State Forest, making for some beautiful scenery. The beach is a great place to relax and go for a swim. The area has numerous hiking trails and connectors, including a trek up to the famous Moonville Tunnel. You can also visit the restored Hope Furnace, a blast furnace that sits near one end of the lake.

 

photo via Britannica

Salt Fork State Park

Just a few miles from historic Cambridge, is Salt Fork State Park, Ohio’s largest state park. The Park surrounds much of Salt Fork Lake and offers a variety of activities, such as hiking, boating, horseback riding, and golf.

The Salt Fork Lodge is a great place to stay with the family, as well as host a conference.

 

Central Ohio

photo via TripAdvisor

Blackhand Gorge State Nature Preserve

Named for a famed, and lost, Native American petroglyph that was found in the gorge, Blackhand Gorge is one of the most beautiful areas in Central Ohio. The preserve has many hiking trails to explore, as well as remnants of its past, including a section of the Ohio & Erie Canal locks and an interurban tunnel. Visitors can also explore the area via canoe or kayak on the Licking River.

 

photo via Wikipedia

Buckeye Lake State Park

Renowned in Central Ohio for boating, Buckeye Lake State Park is a water lover’s paradise. The lake is surrounded by quaint communities, and has plenty of activities for non-boaters as well. You can even visit Cranberry Bog, which is a natural marvel. Tours of the bog usually occur in June.

 

photo via TripAdvisor

Mohican State Park

Located between the historic communities of Wooster, Millersburg, Mount Vernon, and Ashland, Mohican is a forested oasis and perfect for a weekend getaway. The park has several hiking trails, campgrounds, and even a covered bridge. For a unique place to stay during your visit, check out the treehouses at The Mohicans.

 

photo via Dawes Arboretum

Dawes Arboretum

Just east of Columbus, you will find a true gem of a park, Dawes Arboretum. The Arboretum seems to have it all: historic Daweswood Farm, numerous trails, a nature center, formal Japanese garden, and even a driving tour. It’s a definite stop for any nature lover, and best of all, it’s free to visit!

While in the area, make sure to visit the newly revamped downtown in Newark and catch a show at the historic Midland Theatre.

 

photo via Ohio DNR

Rhododendron Cove State Nature Preserve

Located just south of Lancaster, Rhododendron Cove Preserve sits on an unassuming hill, but offers a bounty of beauty once you make it to the summit. Atop the hill are dozens of Rhododendrons nestled amongst rocky outcroppings, making for great photography. After visiting Rhododendron Cove, travel down the road and visit two additional parks: Wahkeena Nature Preserve and Clear Creek Metro Park.

 

photo via Thought & Sight

Bonus: Topiary Park

On the eastside of downtown Columbus, The Topiary Park is a living art installation on the grounds of the former Ohio Deaf School campus. Visitors can either take docent-led tours or explore the park on their own. In addition to the numerous plant sculptures, there is also a “tree walk” visitors can take to see the many types of trees within the park. Choosy Traveler has details on some other worthwhile parks in the Columbus area, including Battelle Darby Creek, where you can see wild bison, and Shrum Mound.

Southwest Ohio

photo via Fabulous 50s

John Bryan State Park – Clifton

Located near the historic Village of Clifton, John Bryan State Park is defined by the Little Miami River and the Clifton Gorge area it carved out. The striking features of the gorge and the forested landscape surrounding it make for some beautiful hiking scenery year-round. The next time you visit Clifton Mill, make sure to stop by John Bryan State Park.

 

photo via Ohio DNR

Caesar Creek State Park

Nestled between Waynesville and Harveysburg, Caesar Creek State Park is a fossil hunter’s playground. You will need to apply for a fossil collecting permit to hunt fossils at the park, but it is well worth the effort. Some common finds include trilobites, brachiopods, and corals. In addition to fossil hunting, the park also offers camping, swimming, and boating. Other attractions in the area include historic downtown Lebanon and Caesar’s Creek Pioneer Village.

 

photo via ForestWander

Fallsville Wildlife Area

Like the name suggests, the prominent feature of the Fallsville Wildlife Area is a large, serene waterfall. The small park packs in the beauty and is perfect for a relaxing afternoon stroll to the eye-pleasing waterfall and old mill site.

While in the area, check out the historic downtown of nearby Wilmington. There are a lot of great shops and the inside of the Clinton County Courthouse is stunning.

 

photo via Premier Park Events

Ault Park

When you look at “must-see” lists of Cincinnati, you will undoubtedly come across Ault Park. A visit to the park will certainly show you why. As you arrive, you will immediately notice the large and picturesque Renaissance-style pavilion, popular with wedding parties. Beyond the pavilion, you will find several walking trails, a beautiful botanical garden, and plenty of relaxing space.

 

Northwest Ohio

photo via Toledo Regional Tour

Side Cut Metropark

Side Cut Metropark is steeped in history. The park occupied land that was once part of a side cut of the Miami & Erie Canals. You can still visit 3 of the 6 locks from the canals, having been restored by WPA workers in the 1930s. Beyond the historic locks, the park offers picturesque scenery, an extensive network of trails, and plenty of wildlife.

 

photo via Mapio

Wildwood Metropark

Wildwood Preserve was once the home of Champion Spark Plug founder, Robert Stranahan. The park has an amazing wooded trail network and the property still has the Georgian Colonial Manor House Stranahan built. It is a must visit park in the heart of Toledo.

 

photo via Jim McCormac

Magee Marsh Wildlife Area

Every spring, thousands of migratory birds visit Magee Marsh on their way to their summer nesting spots. Located on the shore of Lake Erie, the marsh is not only a destination for birders, but the extensive trail network of the wildlife area and nature center make for a great afternoon out with the family.

 

photo via Ohio DNR

North Bass Island State Park

Unlike other parks on this list, getting to North Bass Island is a bit challenging to get to, but worth the hassle. Currently, the only means to get to the island are boat and airplane. Once you get to the island, you’ll be able to take in the gorgeous, untouched wilderness. Fishing is permitted on the island, as well as hiking and camping via permit.

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Stoddart Block Easement

260 S 4th St,
Columbus, OH 43215

 

In December of 2013, Heritage Ohio received a conservation easement on the Stoddart Block, and the adjoining Zettler Building, in downtown Columbus. For a building that began life as a furniture store, the newest chapter in its history would depend on millennials in search of a vibrant downtown.

As millennials continue to descend on downtown locations to live (and Columbus is no different than other big cities) the cost of prime downtown rentals continues to increase. To stem the rising rental cost, developers have turned to a new model: micro-living.

Trading off a living room in your apartment with a downtown “living room” full of entertainment options, the apartments’ modest square footage is ideally suited for the typical 20-something that hasn’t accumulated a lifetime of stuff or children! And pricing remains affordable—you can net a downtown Columbus address for less than $1,000 a month.

Beginning its existence as the Frohock Furniture Company, the building was well-suited for a conversion to residential use. From a financial standpoint, granting a conservation easement to Heritage Ohio provided the charitable deduction to the building owner that ultimately helped the project move forward. However, both the federal and state tax credits also provided critical sources of capital to make the project a reality.

Commented director Joyce Barrett, “The Stoddart and Zettler renovations brought new downtown living options, and a couple popular eateries, but also showed how historic buildings created for a specific use can be creatively repurposed to meet today’s needs.”

 

For more information on Heritage Ohio’s easement program, contact Frank Quinn at fquinn@heritageohio.org or at 614.258.6200.

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Ohio’s Best Historic Bars to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

image via Happy Dog at Euclid Tavern

1.  The Euclid Tavern – Cleveland

Referred to locals as “the Euc”, the Euclid Tavern has operated in University Circle since 1909. It’s long had a reputation of being a hangout for college students and blue collar workers.

In the 80s and 90s, the bar hosted some of the famous names of the era including Green Day, Helmet, and Ween. It was also a filming location in the Michael J. Fox movie, “Light of Day”.

After several changes in ownership, the Euclid Tavern is now home to Happy Dog, but still retains the vibe and classic neon sign.

 

image via ClutchMov

2. Harmar Tavern – Marietta

Located in the historic Harmar Village on the westside of Marietta, the Harmar Tavern has been operating since 1900. It is a casual neighborhood bar and home to the “Soon to be Famous Fried Bologna Sandwich” and reportedly, a few ghosts.

The Harmar Tavern is a favorite among college students and locals alike, and has an amazing patio too.

 

image via The Backstretch

3. The Backstretch – Delaware

A great place for a bite to eat and a beer, The Backstretch has called downtown Delaware home since 1982. The bar is the latest to operate out of this historic space. The space housed other famous spots, including Buttsy’s Bar and Grill and Holly’s Place.

A favorite among locals, we recommend you stop in on your next visit to Delaware.

 

image via OTR Matters

4. Arnold’s Bar & Grill – Cincinnati

Since Simon Arnold opened up in 1861, Arnold’s Bar & Grill has been a legendary haunt in downtown Cincinnati. The tavern survived prohibition by opening a kitchen and has remained popular for both food and drink, as well as live music, ever since.

 

image via Kent Wired

5. Ray’s Place – Kent

Ray’s Place has been a fixture of downtown Kent since 1937. Fans of sports bars should make a pilgrimage to Ray’s. It is considered to be one of the first, if not the first sports bar in the US. There is even a book detailing the history of this Kent landmark.

Ray’s Place is also the namesake of the Ray’s Place Entrepreneurship Scholarship at Kent State University, promoting entrepreneurship and business innovation.

 

image via Elevator Brewing

6. Elevator Brewery & Draught Haus- Columbus

Located in the historic Columbia Building in downtown Columbus, the Elevator Brewery and Draught Haus is one of the most visually striking bars in the city. The bar started off as the Bott Brother’s Billiards 1897, operating until prohibition. It later became the famous The Clock Restaurant, before opening as Elevator in 2000.

Unlike the other bars on this list, this one has an interesting award that very few in the US can boast. The back-bar won a blue ribbon for craftsmanship at the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893!

Elevator’s beer is brewed just a few blocks away on North Fourth Street and you can visit their 13th Floor Taproom on site.

Heritage Ohio holds a historic conservation easement on the Columbia Building.

 

 

Image via Ye Olde Trail Tavern

7. Ye Olde Trail Tavern – Yellow Springs

The Ye Olde Trail Tavern is Ohio’s oldest tavern and second oldest restaurant behind the Golden Lamb in Lebanon. Opened in 1827 to serve travelers moving between Columbus and Cincinnati, the tavern is a must-stop historic destination in downtown Yellow Springs.

Like the Harman Tavern, this location is home to a few friendly spirits too.

 

image via Cleveland.com

8. Ontario Street Cafe – Cleveland

The Ontario Street Cafe, in the historic Gateway District in downtown Cleveland, is like stepping back in time. Not much has changed in the historic bar, which should be part of the appeal to any history loving bar-goer. Beyond the historic appeal, the Ontario is renowned for fantastic corned beef sandwiches and reasonably priced drinks. Cheers!

 

image via Courthouse Inn & Restaurant

9. Courthouse Inn & Restaurant – Lisbon

I don’t think I have ever told someone to visit a place to check out a bathroom, but you have to see the bathroom! The Courthouse Inn & Restaurant in downtown Lisbon is a sight to see. Housed in the historic Hamilton Building, the Courthouse Inn serves up amazing vegetarian fare that even a carnivore can love, and great cocktails, too. They also have an amazing patio, so make sure to pay them a visit on St. Patrick’s Day and again in warmer weather.

Back to the bathrooms. It, like most of the place, is very artistically designed. Quite possibly the most luxurious bathroom in all of Ohio. Trust us, just go see it.

 

Shop Local on Main Street & Etsy! St Patrick’s Day Picks from Ohio Shops:

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Julian Building Easement

272 S Front St,
Columbus, OH 43215

 

In December of 2013, Heritage Ohio received a conservation easement on the Julian, a former shoe factory located at the corner of Main Street and Front Street, in downtown Columbus. And anyone who had spent time downtown prior to 2013 remembers what the building looked like.

With a history as a builder of new retail and residential buildings, Casto, the building owner, was embarking on a new venture: namely, a historic rehab. And it’s safe to say that their first Columbus target was one of downtown’s ugliest buildings, the former Julian and Kokenge Building (or Lape and Adler, as it was known for a portion of its history). It’s also safe to say their foray into rehab turned out to be an unqualified success!

To see the building today, you might not realize that the windows are replacements, comprising a design painstakingly replicated to be faithful to the original. And you might not realize the extent of concrete and masonry restoration work that went into repairing the exterior elements.

We were especially excited to promote the building’s amazing transformation in October of 2015 as the venue for our Legacy Circle Reception, kicking off our annual conference. Attendees gathered on the ground floor for networking, and had the opportunity to tour model units.

“We know that preservationists have a keen vision for ‘what could be’ but I think even ardent preservationists had a hard time envisioning just how good the Julian Building could look, after rehab. But the Casto developers pulled it off, and now we all get to enjoy this beautiful historic building once again, gracing the downtown streetscape,” stated Joyce Barrett, director of Heritage Ohio.

For more information on Heritage Ohio’s easement program, contact Frank Quinn at fquinn@heritageohio.org or at 614.258.6200.

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YOP Columbus Metropolitan Library Tour & Cocktail Party

Thursday, Aug 25, 2016 4:30 PM – 9:00 PM

The Columbus Metropolitan Library recently underwent a major renovation and we cannot wait to see the results! Join YOP for this tour and learn from the pros how the contemporary addition respected this beautiful historic library. The tour will be lead by Project Architect Brian Pawlowski, with Schooley Caldwell. It will take about an hour, and he will give a detailed description of the design decisions made.

The Parking Garage in the basement of the Library provides plenty of spaces, however there is a small cost. There is on-street parking also available. We will meet in the atrium in the Carnegie Library to begin our tour.

Following the tour, stroll over to a Town Street Garden Party hosted by Columbus’s leading preservationists, Jeff Darbee, Nancy Recchie, Bob Loversidge, Judy Williams, and Kate and Tom Matheny. Enjoy drinks and snacks, and a wonderful atmosphere you can only get in downtown’s historic corridor.

If you just want to tour the library with us, please register below. The tour is free, however, space is limited.

Please be sure to register for the cocktail party and take advantage of the opportunity to have a drink with leading professionals in historic preservation and architecture. If you are a paid YOP member then it is just $10. If you have not yet joined YOP it is only $35, which includes your $25 membership and all the benefits that come with it.

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