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Sash Mob! Windows Workshop

Thank You to our Partners

Join us May 19-21 for this awesome wood windows workshop weekend!

Heritage Ohio is partnering with Marsh Building Products, Marvin Windows and Doors, Habitat for Humanity Cincinnati, and Community Matters to teach window restoration while giving back to Lower Price Hill

They’re caked with paint, riddled with cracked glass, drafty, and they’ve been stuck shut longer than you’ve been alive. If we’ve described the window situation in your historic house, then it’s time to do something about it, and we don’t mean replace them. Heritage Ohio is excited to announce that we’re bringing old windows guru Jim Turner back to Ohio to help us conduct a #SashMob2017 in Cincinnati in May, and you’re invited.

Continuing Education

This 3 day workshop series offers up to 20 AIA HSW continuing education credits in total!

Friday Sessions

The sessions taking place on Friday the 19th will be classroom style and cover everything you need to know about wood windows, including how you can make them more energy efficient without replacing them and how to be safe when dealing with the potential of lead paint. Considering a restoration project? Don’t miss Chick McBrien, Marvin Windows and Doors, talk about research, planning, window assessment, standards, and historic tax credits with concern to historic restoration projects.

We will have window restoration specialist and National Trust Advisor Jim Turner, of Turner Restoration, talk about window restoration and will be available at the end of the day for an “Ask an Expert” session. If you have old windows that you would like to get advice on or an expert’s opinion about, please bring your pictures and your information with you to this workshop and ask Jim! He can answer your questions about both wood and steel windows. If you don’t need expert advice than you can join us for a tour of the Community Matters complex and learn about the amazing projects and work that this organization has been able to do in the Lower Price Hill neighborhood.

 

Find more information and register for Friday HERE!

 

Friday Night

Join Heritage Ohio and the Cincinnati Preservation Collective for a happy hour at The Mockbee! As part of the Sash Mob! Windows Workshop Weekend these preservation forces are teaming up to welcome the many preservation professionals from across the nation, who are coming to work in the great city of Cincinnati.  

The happy hour will start at 6 pm with a tour of this fantastic building and we will wrap up the night by 9 pm. After all, we have some windows to save the next morning! 

Saturday and Sunday Hands-On Workshop

If you’ve ever wanted to learn about making your old windows functional, energy efficient, or just more attractive; or, if you’re ready to tackle your own windows DIY project, but don’t know where to begin, then the weekend hands-on workshop is the answer for you! Over the course of two days May 20 and 21 you will learn about:

– the basics of window anatomy,
– freeing up you stuck windows,
– installing weather stripping,
– repairing weight ropes and chains,
– cutting and replacing glass, and
– re-glazing window sash.

Window restoration specialist and National Trust Advisor Jim Turner, of Turner Restoration, will lead the workshop.

 

Find more information and register for the weekend HERE!

 

Event Location

Friday’s sessions and portions of the weekend workshop will take place at  The Sanctuary at Community Matters. The majority of the weekend workshop will take place at two buildings nearby where we will be restoring windows on-site.

Community Matters- 2110 St Michael St, Cincinnati, OH 45204

 

 

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Stoddart Block Easement

260 S 4th St,
Columbus, OH 43215

 

In December of 2013, Heritage Ohio received a conservation easement on the Stoddart Block, and the adjoining Zettler Building, in downtown Columbus. For a building that began life as a furniture store, the newest chapter in its history would depend on millennials in search of a vibrant downtown.

As millennials continue to descend on downtown locations to live (and Columbus is no different than other big cities) the cost of prime downtown rentals continues to increase. To stem the rising rental cost, developers have turned to a new model: micro-living.

Trading off a living room in your apartment with a downtown “living room” full of entertainment options, the apartments’ modest square footage is ideally suited for the typical 20-something that hasn’t accumulated a lifetime of stuff or children! And pricing remains affordable—you can net a downtown Columbus address for less than $1,000 a month.

Beginning its existence as the Frohock Furniture Company, the building was well-suited for a conversion to residential use. From a financial standpoint, granting a conservation easement to Heritage Ohio provided the charitable deduction to the building owner that ultimately helped the project move forward. However, both the federal and state tax credits also provided critical sources of capital to make the project a reality.

Commented director Joyce Barrett, “The Stoddart and Zettler renovations brought new downtown living options, and a couple popular eateries, but also showed how historic buildings created for a specific use can be creatively repurposed to meet today’s needs.”

 

For more information on Heritage Ohio’s easement program, contact Frank Quinn at fquinn@heritageohio.org or at 614.258.6200.

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Ohio’s Best Historic Bars to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

image via Happy Dog at Euclid Tavern

1.  The Euclid Tavern – Cleveland

Referred to locals as “the Euc”, the Euclid Tavern has operated in University Circle since 1909. It’s long had a reputation of being a hangout for college students and blue collar workers.

In the 80s and 90s, the bar hosted some of the famous names of the era including Green Day, Helmet, and Ween. It was also a filming location in the Michael J. Fox movie, “Light of Day”.

After several changes in ownership, the Euclid Tavern is now home to Happy Dog, but still retains the vibe and classic neon sign.

 

image via ClutchMov

2. Harmar Tavern – Marietta

Located in the historic Harmar Village on the westside of Marietta, the Harmar Tavern has been operating since 1900. It is a casual neighborhood bar and home to the “Soon to be Famous Fried Bologna Sandwich” and reportedly, a few ghosts.

The Harmar Tavern is a favorite among college students and locals alike, and has an amazing patio too.

 

image via The Backstretch

3. The Backstretch – Delaware

A great place for a bite to eat and a beer, The Backstretch has called downtown Delaware home since 1982. The bar is the latest to operate out of this historic space. The space housed other famous spots, including Buttsy’s Bar and Grill and Holly’s Place.

A favorite among locals, we recommend you stop in on your next visit to Delaware.

 

image via OTR Matters

4. Arnold’s Bar & Grill – Cincinnati

Since Simon Arnold opened up in 1861, Arnold’s Bar & Grill has been a legendary haunt in downtown Cincinnati. The tavern survived prohibition by opening a kitchen and has remained popular for both food and drink, as well as live music, ever since.

 

image via Kent Wired

5. Ray’s Place – Kent

Ray’s Place has been a fixture of downtown Kent since 1937. Fans of sports bars should make a pilgrimage to Ray’s. It is considered to be one of the first, if not the first sports bar in the US. There is even a book detailing the history of this Kent landmark.

Ray’s Place is also the namesake of the Ray’s Place Entrepreneurship Scholarship at Kent State University, promoting entrepreneurship and business innovation.

 

image via Elevator Brewing

6. Elevator Brewery & Draught Haus- Columbus

Located in the historic Columbia Building in downtown Columbus, the Elevator Brewery and Draught Haus is one of the most visually striking bars in the city. The bar started off as the Bott Brother’s Billiards 1897, operating until prohibition. It later became the famous The Clock Restaurant, before opening as Elevator in 2000.

Unlike the other bars on this list, this one has an interesting award that very few in the US can boast. The back-bar won a blue ribbon for craftsmanship at the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893!

Elevator’s beer is brewed just a few blocks away on North Fourth Street and you can visit their 13th Floor Taproom on site.

Heritage Ohio holds a historic conservation easement on the Columbia Building.

 

 

Image via Ye Olde Trail Tavern

7. Ye Olde Trail Tavern – Yellow Springs

The Ye Olde Trail Tavern is Ohio’s oldest tavern and second oldest restaurant behind the Golden Lamb in Lebanon. Opened in 1827 to serve travelers moving between Columbus and Cincinnati, the tavern is a must-stop historic destination in downtown Yellow Springs.

Like the Harman Tavern, this location is home to a few friendly spirits too.

 

image via Cleveland.com

8. Ontario Street Cafe – Cleveland

The Ontario Street Cafe, in the historic Gateway District in downtown Cleveland, is like stepping back in time. Not much has changed in the historic bar, which should be part of the appeal to any history loving bar-goer. Beyond the historic appeal, the Ontario is renowned for fantastic corned beef sandwiches and reasonably priced drinks. Cheers!

 

image via Courthouse Inn & Restaurant

9. Courthouse Inn & Restaurant – Lisbon

I don’t think I have ever told someone to visit a place to check out a bathroom, but you have to see the bathroom! The Courthouse Inn & Restaurant in downtown Lisbon is a sight to see. Housed in the historic Hamilton Building, the Courthouse Inn serves up amazing vegetarian fare that even a carnivore can love, and great cocktails, too. They also have an amazing patio, so make sure to pay them a visit on St. Patrick’s Day and again in warmer weather.

Back to the bathrooms. It, like most of the place, is very artistically designed. Quite possibly the most luxurious bathroom in all of Ohio. Trust us, just go see it.

 

Shop Local on Main Street & Etsy! St Patrick’s Day Picks from Ohio Shops:

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Julian Building Easement

272 S Front St,
Columbus, OH 43215

 

In December of 2013, Heritage Ohio received a conservation easement on the Julian, a former shoe factory located at the corner of Main Street and Front Street, in downtown Columbus. And anyone who had spent time downtown prior to 2013 remembers what the building looked like.

With a history as a builder of new retail and residential buildings, Casto, the building owner, was embarking on a new venture: namely, a historic rehab. And it’s safe to say that their first Columbus target was one of downtown’s ugliest buildings, the former Julian and Kokenge Building (or Lape and Adler, as it was known for a portion of its history). It’s also safe to say their foray into rehab turned out to be an unqualified success!

To see the building today, you might not realize that the windows are replacements, comprising a design painstakingly replicated to be faithful to the original. And you might not realize the extent of concrete and masonry restoration work that went into repairing the exterior elements.

We were especially excited to promote the building’s amazing transformation in October of 2015 as the venue for our Legacy Circle Reception, kicking off our annual conference. Attendees gathered on the ground floor for networking, and had the opportunity to tour model units.

“We know that preservationists have a keen vision for ‘what could be’ but I think even ardent preservationists had a hard time envisioning just how good the Julian Building could look, after rehab. But the Casto developers pulled it off, and now we all get to enjoy this beautiful historic building once again, gracing the downtown streetscape,” stated Joyce Barrett, director of Heritage Ohio.

For more information on Heritage Ohio’s easement program, contact Frank Quinn at fquinn@heritageohio.org or at 614.258.6200.

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Toledo Club Easement

235 14th Street,
Toledo, OH 43604

 

When Heritage Ohio took its first easement, an agreement executed in 2004 on the Rawson Block in Findlay, the scope of the easement covered changes to the façade, only. However, easement agreements can cover the entire exterior of a building; indeed, the IRS subsequent to 2004 required a conservation easement agreement to cover the entire exterior of a building, if the building owner wanted to treat the easement agreement as the equivalent of a charitable contribution to Heritage Ohio). Easement agreements can also cover the interior of a building, and even specific elements within a building. When Heritage Ohio accepted an easement on the Toledo Club in July of 2012, it marked the first instance of an easement agreement that included not only the protected exterior, but also included protected interior spaces. It also marked the first instance of a non-profit donating an easement to Heritage Ohio.

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Toledo Club Exterior

If you’re not familiar with the Toledo Club, it’s just as amazing on the inside as it is the outside. A fine example of Georgian Revival architecture, the club has been housed here since the building’s construction in 1915. 2012 Legacy Circle Reception attendees may remember the Red Room at the Toledo Club, with its warm oak paneling, and coffered ceiling with intricate stencils. And each room could be considered a piece of architectural artwork.

Centennial Room 2

Centennial Room in the Toledo Club

Joyce Barrett, executive director of Heritage Ohio, commented on the Toledo Club easement: “Our collaboration with the Toledo Club shows how flexible an easement agreement can be, and that the property owner concerned with the long-term preservation of their historic building, whether for-profit or not-for-profit, could benefit by partnering with Heritage Ohio.”

For more information on Heritage Ohio’s easement program, contact Frank Quinn at fquinn@heritageohio.org or at 614.258.6200.

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YOP Columbus Metropolitan Library Tour & Cocktail Party

Thursday, Aug 25, 2016 4:30 PM – 9:00 PM

The Columbus Metropolitan Library recently underwent a major renovation and we cannot wait to see the results! Join YOP for this tour and learn from the pros how the contemporary addition respected this beautiful historic library. The tour will be lead by Project Architect Brian Pawlowski, with Schooley Caldwell. It will take about an hour, and he will give a detailed description of the design decisions made.

The Parking Garage in the basement of the Library provides plenty of spaces, however there is a small cost. There is on-street parking also available. We will meet in the atrium in the Carnegie Library to begin our tour.

Following the tour, stroll over to a Town Street Garden Party hosted by Columbus’s leading preservationists, Jeff Darbee, Nancy Recchie, Bob Loversidge, Judy Williams, and Kate and Tom Matheny. Enjoy drinks and snacks, and a wonderful atmosphere you can only get in downtown’s historic corridor.

If you just want to tour the library with us, please register below. The tour is free, however, space is limited.

Please be sure to register for the cocktail party and take advantage of the opportunity to have a drink with leading professionals in historic preservation and architecture. If you are a paid YOP member then it is just $10. If you have not yet joined YOP it is only $35, which includes your $25 membership and all the benefits that come with it.

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The Municipal Light Plant Easement

577-589 W Nationwide Blvd
Columbus, OH 43215

 

facade_east_elevation_IMG_1245_BrightIn December of 2015, Heritage Ohio held a signing ceremony to formalize its latest easement agreement, focused on protecting the exterior character of the former Municipal Light Plant in Columbus. The Municipal Light Plant represents the ninth easement agreement Heritage Ohio holds. Although the light plant had been closed since the 1970s, and seemed destined for a date with the wrecking ball, City of Columbus leaders instead eyed the potential for site development that included the preservation of the existing buildings.

After sending out RFPs, and opening the building for public viewing and walk-throughs, the winning proposal (which thankfully included preservation of the site’s buildings) was chosen. The developer focused on redevelopment plans, and contacted Heritage Ohio to inquire about donating an easement. With official word of listing in the National Register in December, the building was now deemed “officially” historic. Listing now meant the owner could donate the easement to Heritage Ohio, giving the owner eligibility to treat the easement donation as a charitable contribution. The charitable contribution allowed the owner to take a tax deduction on federal income tax.

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“We’re excited that we can help play a role in the continued use and preservation of historic buildings, and that the easement donation preserves the historic former Municipal Light Plant in perpetuity. We can’t wait to see the developer’s finished product, as the rehabilitated buildings will add to the vibrancy in the district,” stated Joyce Barrett, director of Heritage Ohio.

The Municipal Light Plant easement comprises the fifth easement agreement in Columbus, and includes agreements for preservation of iconic structures such as the Julian, and the Larrimer Building (housing the landmark Elevator Brewery & Draught House). Heritage Ohio accepted its first easement in 2004, working with the owners of the Rawson Block in downtown Findlay to insure the landmark’s preservation.

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Tiffin Dollars and Sense of Building Rehabilitation Workshop

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Old House Fair Q&A

Old House Fair Q&A: Everything you need to know about our second annual Old House Fair.

We’re excited to bring you the second annual Old House Fair, taking place on Saturday, May 7, in historic downtown Medina, Ohio. If you have questions about the Old House Fair then we’re here to provide the answers.

Where is the Old House Fair taking place?

The Old House Fair is happening right downtown, with sessions and events on Medina’s historic Square, and an additional track of sessions at the Medina County District Library. The library address is 210 South Broadway, and it’s located adjacent to the southeast corner of the Square.

What’s happening at the Old House Fair and where can I see the agenda?

Over the course of Saturday, beginning at 9:30 am with opening comments from Bernice Radle, we’ll have information and demonstration sessions, a variety old house vendors under the big tent, and a host of additional activities. You can view the full Old House Fair agenda here.

What else is happening?

We have a special reception for Bernice Radle on Friday, beginning at 6 pm, at Root Candles. Network with your fellow Old House Fairgoers, meet Bernice Radle, and check out Root’s wonderful candle selection. Tickets are just $25 per person, and each attendee receives a complimentary candle, and a 40% discount on any purchases at Root Candles! You can purchase your tickets here.

The Old House Fair Olympics are back and better, beginning at 1 pm. Here’s your chance to test your old house IQ and tool skills in a friendly competition with your fellow fairgoers. To the victors will go the coveted “Golden Hammer!”

New this year, we’ll have the Preservation Month Photo Contest Peoples’ Choice Cash Award. Our 2016 finalist images will be on display Saturday, and we’ll have in-person voting. You can vote by putting a dollar or two toward your favorite image, and the finalist image that receives the most votes (dollars) during voting wins their “votes.”

For the kids coming to the Old House Fair, we’ll have a mini-barn raising happening right on the Square beginning at 10 am. Paul Knoebel, a charter member of Friends of Ohio Barns, will direct the barn raising process. In the process, the children will learn about the traditional craft of timber framing, and how the barn fits together with large posts and beams, securing the frame with just wooden pegs. Children under 13 can attend the Old House Fair free of charge with a parent’s paid ticket to attend.

Finally, the Medina Town Hall & Engine House Museum located at 50 Public Square will be open 11 am-2 pm on Saturday. A great local history museum, stop in to learn more about the story of Medina and what makes this community unique.

How much are tickets and where do I purchase them?

Tickets are just $10 to attend and available for purchase here. Children under 13 can attend for free with a parent’s paid ticket.

Where do I park?

Medina has plenty of free parking around the Square. Check out this map with parking lots noted here.

What about restrooms?

Medina has a public restroom facility, including a family restroom, located on the northwest corner of the Square, which will be accessible during the Old House Fair.

What food options do we have around the Square?

Medina offers a veritable cornucopia of dining options ringing the Square, so grab a bite to eat at noon, and we’ll see you back for the afternoon sessions. Check out dining options here.

We love our sponsors and vendors and hope you do too!

The Old House Fair wouldn’t be possible without the support of our major Old House Fair sponsors, Benjamin Moore Paints and The Painted House & More, and the City of Medina, and our local partners Main Street Medina. And thanks to our vendors: Community Action Wayne/Medina, Medina Community Design Committee, Progress Through Preservation, Total Home Inspection Services, Ursuline College Historic Preservation Program, and Young Ohio Preservationists.

We hope we’ve answered your questions, but feel free to use the Comments below to ask your question and we’ll get you an answer. See you at the Old House Fair!

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Our Preservation Month Photo Contest is open for entries!

Preservation Month is just around the corner…well, OK, still a few weeks off, but, our 7th Annual Preservation Month Photo Contest is now open for entries! We’re looking for great subject matter capturing the spirit of preservation & revitalization in our communities.

And while we’re hoping to capture the spirit of preservation & revitalization, this year we’re also co-opting the #iwanttoberecycled campaign (you can check out the campaign here). So, submit a picture of a great historic building in your community waiting to be recycled, or a photo of a building that has been recycled for a new use and given a new life. We preservationists know that the value of recycling isn’t limited to that plastic shampoo bottle or empty soda can, so let’s broaden the conversation.

When you get that perfect shot, submit it to us. We have a limit of one entry per person, so you have to send us your very best! You can enter here (we have the form at the bottom of the page) or post your entry on our Facebook wall using the hashtag #heritageohiophotocontest. You can also enter through Instagram, again using the hashtag #heritageohiophotocontest. Add the #iwanttoberecycled hashtag, too, and help broaden the conversation about the things we use that deserve to be recycled.

We’ll accept entries through Friday, April 29. Online voting for your favorite finalist begins Saturday, May 7, and closes at 5 PM on Friday, May 13. Our photo contest winner, bringing preservation fame and a featured spot on the cover of Revitalize Ohio, will be announced Monday, May 16.

New this year, when we name our finalists on Saturday, we’ll have in-person voting for a Peoples’ Choice Cash Award at the Old House Fair. The finalist image that receives the most votes (dollars) during voting at the Old House Fair gets to keep their “votes.”  So, if you’re at the Old House Fair, check out the finalists and put a buck or two toward your favorite.

Some guidelines to remember: be creative and original with your photo composition…we love photo entries depicting historic buildings in use (or, for this year, historic buildings waiting to be in use); make sure your image highlights Ohio subject matter; and finally, use your best judgment as to whether or not you should get permission from the building owner before photographing your subject matter.

The Arcade

Our 2015 winner, Judith Khaner, captured the architectural beauty of The Arcade in Cleveland

Good luck!

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